Documentaries followed by expert speakers and audience discussion

 
theater

Location

Grand Theater
191 High Street NE
Salem, Oregon

Hours

Doors open at 6:15p
Films begin at 7p

Admission

Adults $4
Students $3

Contact

503-881-5305
503-779-5288

Coming Attractions


The Last Mountain

Good FoodThursday, September 8, 2011
7 PM

The mining & burning of coal is at the epicenter of America’s struggle to balance its energy needs with environmental concerns. The BIG COAL industry detonates the explosive power of a Hiroshima bomb each & every week, shredding timeless landscape & leaving devastated communities & poisoned water. Oregon is at a turning point with the upcoming closure of the Boardman Coal Burning Plant, with opportunities for creating reliable, renewable sources of energy that will bring economic improvement, cleaner air and water. Stars Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Website


Speakers

Allan Pollock

Bill Bradbury
In early 2011 Bill Bradbury was appointed by Governor Kulongoski to the NW Power and Conservation Council, a four-state compact to oversee regional energy and Columbia River salmon. Prior to this position, Bill served as Oregon’s Secretary of State and appointed chair of the Oregon Sustainability Board. Bill also served as Executive Director for For The Sake Of The Salmon, a 3-state coalition dedicated to finding common ground for salmon restoration.

Bill was one of the first 50 participants in Vice President Al Gore’s Climate Change training sessions and has given more than 200 Climate Change in Oregon presentations. Born in Chicago, Bill has lived in Oregon since 1971, first settling in Bandon where he owned and operated a small business. He then served 14 years in Oregon’s Legislature as a State Representative from 1981 to 1985 and as a State Senator from 1985 to 1995.

He was Senate Majority Leader from 1986 to 1993 and Senate President from 1993 to 1995. Bill lives in Salem with his wife, Katy.

Gerald Fox

Laura Stevens
Laura Stevens, Organizing Representative for the Sierra Club Beyond Coal campaign in Oregon and Southwest Washington, works with concerned citizens to stop coal export projects and towards a coal-free northwest.  

Laura, a native Oregonian, obtained her B.A. from DePauw University, and has spent the past four years organizing for a number of environmental, human rights, and labor groups.  

After Laura launched and led the Sierra Club Campuses Beyond Coal campaign at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNC made a commitment to move their on-campus coal-fired power plant off of mountain-top removal mined coal immediately, and set a date to move the plant off of coal entirely. 

For more information on how you can help stop coal exports in Oregon, contact Laura at laura.stevens@sierraclub.org or visit www.coalfreeoregon.org. 

 

Unnatural Causes

soldiers of peaceThursday, October 13, 2011
7 PM

This documentary crisscrosses the nation uncovering startling new findings that suggest there is much more to our health than bad habits, health care, or unlucky genes. The social circumstances in which we are born, live, and work can actually get under our skin and disrupt our physiology as much as germs and viruses. Research has revealed a gradient to health. At each step down the class pyramid, people tend to be sicker and die sooner. Poor Americans die on average almost six years sooner than the rich. Through what channels might inequities in housing, wealth, jobs, and education, along with a lack of power and control over one's life, translate into bad health.

Website


 

Speakers

Allan Pollock

Dr. Michael Grady
Dr. Michael Grady is the Medical Director for the McClaine Street Clinic and for the Community Outreach Center, serving the underinsured and uninsured respectively in the Silverton area.
 
Dr. Grady received a B.S. in Biology from the Santa Clara University in 1972 and his M.D. degree from OHSU in 1976. He has been a family physician for 35 years and is a past president of the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians. He currently serves on the Community Leadership Council of We Can Do Better, a forum for discussion of  health and health policy.
 
Dr. Grady and his wife Jenny have four grown children and live in Silverton.

Gerald Fox

Scott Richards
Scott Richards, Behavioral Health Division Director at the Marion County Health Department.  Scott oversees adult and crisis mental health services for Marion County.
The Health Department serves over 1,000 adults a year in its outpatient mental health programs; another 3,000 individuals receive services each year at the Psychiatric Crisis Center. 
 
Scott is a native Oregonian who obtained his Masters Degree from Lewis and Clark College in 1983.  He has worked with mentally ill adults in both public and nonprofit agencies for the past twenty eight years.  Scott has been involved in a number of initiatives, including affordable housing development and treatment courts, aimed at addressing the many needs of those suffering from serious mental illness.

Gerald Fox

Levi Herrera-Lopez
Levi Herrera-Lopez is Executive Director of the Mano a Mano Family Center.  He has served in this official capacity since 2008.  Mr. Herrera-Lopez has been involved with this organization since 1997 -- 1997-2005, volunteer youth organizer; 2000-2003, WIA Case Manager; 2003-2005, CAPACES Network Coordinator; 2005-2008, Interim Director.

Other professional experiences include Program Assistant at the Cultural Forum, from 1997-2000, at Chemeketa Community College; and Voter Registration Project Coordinator, summer of 2004, for Voz Hispana. 

Mr. Herrera-Lopez, attended Portland State University, where he majored in Communication Studies, with a dual focus on Media Studies and Intercultural Communication, along with Certificates in Popular Culture Studies and Latin American Studies. He is a native of Zamora de Hidalgo, Michoacan, in Central Mexico, and has lived in Salem, Oregon since 1992.  He attended local schools, including Waldo Middle School and McNary High School, in neighboring Keizer, Oregon.  He was raised in a multicultural, multiracial family in Mexico, and identifies himself as a Mexican, of secular Jewish heritage.  He is a native Spanish (Mexico) speaker, fluent in English, with basic conversational skills in French, and rudimentary knowledge of Japanese and Hebrew. 

 


The Economics of Happiness

tappedThursday, Nov. 10, 2011
7 p.m.

The Economics of Happiness describes a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. On the one hand, government and big business continue to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power. At the same time, all around the world people are resisting those policies, demanding a re-regulation of trade and finance-and, far from the old institutions of power, they're starting to forge a very different future. Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm - an economics of localization.

Website

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Helena Norberg-Hodge Via SKYPE
Helena Norberg-Hodge is an analyst of the impact of the global economy on cultures and agriculture worldwide, a pioneer of the localisation movement, and the articulator of the core ideas of Counter-development. She is the founder and director of the International Society for Ecology and Culture (ISEC).[1] Based in the US and UK, with subsidiaries in Sweden, Germany, Australia, and Ladakh, ISEC's mission is to examine the root causes of our social and environmental crises, while promoting more sustainable and equitable patterns of living in both North and South. Its activities include The Ladakh Project[1], a Local Food program and Global to Local Outreach.
Norberg-Hodge was educated in Sweden, Germany, Austria, England and the United States. She specialised in linguistics, including studies at the doctoral level at the University of London and at MIT, with Noam Chomsky. Fluent in seven languages, she has lived in and studied numerous cultures at varying degrees of industrialisation, giving her a unique international perspective.

Gerald Fox

Kerry Topel
Kerry Topel is the co-founder of Marion-Polk Move To Amend, an organization dedicated to abolishing corporate personhood, is an educator and a recent resident of Salem, Or.  She is passionate about sustainable community development.  She has a master's degree in the Environment and Community program at Humboldt State University where she examined sustainable rural community development through studying community reactions to Nestle Waters North America's failed attempt to site a bottled water facility in McCloud, California.  Kerry is enthusiastic about the power of local economies to enrich and empower community residents to increase their quality of life.  She currently is working to apply her experiences as an educator, activist, and gardener to promote a focus on the local here in Salem. 


GasLand

tappedThursday, Dec. 8, 2011
7 p.m.

The largest domestic natural gas drilling boom in history has swept across the United States. The Halliburton-developed drilling technology of "fracking" or hydraulic fracturing has unlocked a "Saudia Arabia of natural gas" just beneath us. But is fracking safe? When filmmaker Josh Fox is asked to lease his land for drilling, he embarks on a cross-country odyssey uncovering a trail of secrets, lies and contamination. A recently drilled nearby Pennsylvania town reports that residents are able to light their drinking water on fire. This is just one of the many absurd and astonishing revelations of a new country called GASLAND. Part verite travelogue, part expose, part mystery, part bluegrass banjo meltdown, part showdown.

Website


Speakers

Gerald Fox

Michael E. Campana
Michael E. ‘Aquadoc’ Campana is 2011 President of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA), Professor of Hydrogeology and Water Resources at Oregon State University, and former Director of its Institute for Water and Watersheds. He held the Albert and Mary Jane Black Chair of Hydrogeology and directed the Water Resources Program at the University of New Mexico, where he is Emeritus Professor. At the Desert Research Institute he was a research hydrologist and taught in the Hydrologic Sciences Program at the University of Nevada-Reno. He has supervised the work of 75 graduate students. His interests include hydrophilanthropy, water resources policy and management, WaSH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in developing regions, transboundary water resources, and water and environmental education. Central America, Central Asia, and the South Caucasus are his main international interest areas. Campana was a Fulbright Scholar (Belize, 1996) and Visiting Scientist at the Research Institute for Groundwater (Egypt, 1995) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna, 2002). He has served on seven National Research Council committees, including the Klamath Basin and California Bay-Delta committees. He founded and runs the nonprofit Ann Campana Judge Foundation www.acjfoundation.org, which funds and undertakes WaSH projects in Central America. His degrees include a BS (geology) from the College of William and Mary and MS (hydrology) and PhD (hydrology; mathematics minor) from the University of Arizona. As WaterWired he blogswww.waterwired.org and Tweets http://twitter.com/waterwired on water and related issues.

Gerald Fox

Olivia Schmidt
Olivia is the Community Organizer for BARK, defenders of Mt. Hood National Forest. Her current work focuses on stopping the Palomar Pipeline, a proposal by NW Natural to clearcut 47 miles through Mt. Hood for a natural gas pipeline that would facilitate natural gas fracking and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) development. From 2007-2010 Olivia served as Community Organizer for the Northern Oregon faction of the Anti-LNG movement, working with impacted communities and climate activists to stop Liquefied Natural Gas development on the Columbia River and Oregon coast. In recent months LNG proposals in Oregon have transitioned their plans from importing foreign LNG through the Oregon coast to exporting domestic U.S. natural gas to foreign markets and with that change the anti-LNG coalition has shifted its focus to addressing the threats of fracking in the U.S. and the impacts to energy consumers of exporting this resource overseas. Olivia comes to this work from a background in environmental and social justice and has been an Oregon resident for eleven years.

 

 


GrowthBusters

tappedThursday, Jan 12, 2012
7 p.m.

How do we become a sustainable civilization? We are addicted to unending growth in a world that has limits. Individual and public policy decisions today are formed by a powerful, pro-growth cultural bias. We worship at the Church of Growth Everlasting. Undeterred by the facts, we’re on a collision course powered by denial and the myth that growth brings prosperity. This film examines the cultural barriers that prevent us from reacting rationally to the evidence that current levels of population and consumption are unsustainable.

Website


Speakers

Gerald Fox

Dave Gardner Filmmaker

Dave Gardner has worked as a professional director for over 30 years. During his career he’s directed documentaries and other award-winning projects for a long list of Fortune 500 corporate clients and PBS.
 
His concern about our society’s growth addiction began when he noticed rapidly growing population centers in the American West are in denial about the limits of water available to feed their continuing growth frenzy.
Dave’s became the voice of reason in Colorado Springs, a city in the U.S. projected to double in size from half a million in 2000 to 1 million by 2040. As in most cities, growth boosters dominate local politics and policy, so Dave has turned to the film medium to illuminate the follies and educate the public about the true meaning of sustainability. Colorado Springs is serving as just one example in a film of national and global significance.
Dave ran for Colorado Springs city council in 2009 on the platform that true community prosperity could only be achieved by increasing efficiency and localization, not by continuing to chase the mythical “pot of gold at the end of the everlasting growth rainbow.” He lost the race to a well-funded pro-growth incumbent, but garnered 43% of the vote.

Gerald Fox

Mike Swaim
Mike Swaim is a small business owner, with a Private Law Practice in Salem. He has been a practicing attorney since 1971, receiving his BA in Political Science, his MA in International Relations and his JD (Juris Doctor), all from UCLA. Prior to his college education, he served in the US Air Force from 1962-1965, as a Bulgarian Interpreter in Germany.

Mike is a long time leader and volunteer in our community. Among his many volunteer roles, he has been President and member of Salem City Club; President of Salem Parks and Rec. Advisory Board; Chair and Vice-chair of Salem Downtown Development Board; co-founder and member of the Salem Memorial Peace Lecture; and President and member of the Community Coalition for Diversity.

Mike was elected to the position of Mayor of Salem in 1997 and served until 2002. He has also held the position of Commissioner on the Oregon State Capitol Planning Commission, Salem Representative on the Mid-Valley Counsel of Governments, and Salem Representative on Youth. He has received numerous honors, including “Outstanding Citizen Award”, Justice Wallace “Carson Award” for Extraordinary Service to the Community and “Greater Oregon Local Official of the Year” award.

He has been a long time advocate for “smart planning and intelligent growth” as opposed to mindless urban sprawl. Mike’s “Pro-community” vision includes meaningful design standards, efficient in-fill, and community “benefit analysis”.

Mike lives here in Salem with his wife Kellie. They have two sons, Matthew and Darrin and daughter-in-law Katy.

 

 

Hot Coffee

tapped

Thursday, Feb 9, 2012
7 p.m.

Most people think they know the "McDonald's coffee case," but what they don't know is that corporations have spent millions distorting the case to promote tort reform. HOT COFFEE reveals how big business, aided by the media, brewed a dangerous concoction of manipulation and lies to protect corporate interests. By following four people whose lives were devastated by the attacks on our courts, the film challenges the assumptions Americans hold about "jackpot justice."

Website


Speakers

Gerald Fox

Mic Alexander
For over 35 years Mic Alexander has been a servant of justice, with over 100 jury trials and 300 cases at the Court of Appeals and Supreme Court. Alexander is known as one of the most talented lawyers in the Oregon State Bar. A zealous advocate for justice, he has demonstrated tremendous dedication to the Oregon Trial Lawyers Association, the plaintiffs’ bar as a whole and the clients he serves. He has been a partner with the Salem firm Swanson, Lathen, Alexander and McCann since 1980.

Mic Alexander was born in Beaumont, Texas and served in the US Air Force as a Missile Launch Officer in the early 70’s. A 1968 graduate of Stanford University, Alexander went on to get his JD in 1975 from Willamette University School of Law after finishing up his Air Force service. He became an associate at Brown, Burt and Swanson immediately after law school. This is where his journey of advocacy began.

Mic has served on countless task forces, committees, boards and judicial commissions. As the Oregon Trial Lawyer Association President in 2002, Alexander is the only President in the history of the organization to attempt to personally visit every single member’s office. That’s the level of his commitment to service and community building that is an inspiration to all his friends and colleagues.

Alexander received the Distinguished Trial Lawyer Award in August of this year. He lives here in Salem with his wife and has two grown daughters.


Five Friends

tapped

Thursday, March 8, 2012
7 p.m.

We live in the age of the "bromance." Never has pop culture been so fascinated with male friendships. What do they look like? Why are they important? And how do we talk about them without seeming...unmanly? Films like "I Love You, Man" or the recent GQ article entitled "Are You Man Enough for the Man-Date?" are just a couple of examples of how society is wrestling with what male relationships look like in our evolving society. But even the word "bromance" implies a certain awkwardness and an uncertainty about how to refer to these close relationships between men. Early American writer and philosopher, Elbert Hubbard, said, 'My father always used to say that when you die if you've got five real friends you've had a great life.' Five Friends is the story of how one man sought to live that life. Beautifully shot, from the mountains of Southern California to the New England coastline, "Five Friends" captures the intimate relationships of a 65-year-old man and his five friends as they reflect on their lives together, support each other in personal struggle and mine the depths of meaningful friendship. Success, conflict, marriage, divorce, fatherhood, children and dying. These men reveal their fears and dreams to one another in a profound exploration of vulnerability and transparency among men. From touching moments to horrific tragedy and darkness, the spectrum of human emotion colors this breathtaking portrait.

Website

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Kelley D. Strawn
Kelley D. Strawn is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Willamette University in Salem, OR, and the Chair of the Department of Sociology. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A. in Political Science from Boston University, and a B.A. in International Studies from Whitworth College. His areas of expertise within sociology include political sociology and social movements, as well as the sociology of economic change. At Willamette, his primary teaching interests and responsibilities include Navigating Social Worlds (Soc 201), Social Statistics (Soc 301), Quantitative Methods in Social Research (Soc 401W), Social Movements (Soc 315), and Power in Society (Soc 437W). Other courses that he has taught include College Colloquium: Juggernauts of Popular Culture (IDS 101) and American Society (TIUA 0320), a course through Willamette’s partner institution, Tokyo International University of America (TIUA). Dr. Strawn’s research to date has focused on development of the Mexican Protest Event Database (MPED), a database of nationwide protest events in Mexico constructed from media records. The overarching goal of this project is to build a database that (a) allows for examination of Mexico protest trends over time at the national level, and (b) can be used to analyze and better understand media coverage- and selection-biases in the Mexican news media. This research has produced articles on the validity of media data, the relationship between social movements, protest, and societal change in Mexico, and trends in social movement scholarship in the United States and Mexico. This work has been published in journals Mobilization. An International Quarterly and Social Movements Studies, as well as the online journal, Sociology Compass, among other places.

 

Gerald Fox

Tim Buckley
Tim Buckley is a Salem-based writer, editor and communication consultant. 
As a freelancer for 30 years, Tim has been a newspaper reporter, feature writer, advertising copywriter, photographer, magazine editor and author. 
He has also written scripts for a variety of radio, video and DVD productions, as well as interpretive text for trade show displays and museums. 
Over the years, Tim’s work has earned awards from the National Bar Association, National Association of Counties, Society of Professional Journalists, Council for the Advancement and Support of Education and, most recently, from the Corporation for Enterprise Development. He is a partner in Buckley Communications with his wife, Elaine Hultengren. Together, they teach individuals and groups in the use of Nonviolent Communication (NVC). Among those, the couple teaches NVC to inmates weekly at Oregon State Penitentiary.
Since the early 1990s, Tim has been dedicated to “reentry” work in Salem, helping to establish understanding of and support for men and women coming back into our community from incarceration. He has started three men’s groups, the latest of which is hosted weekly at the DeMuniz Pine Street Resource Center, a hub for the Marion County Reentry Initiative.


 

Gerald Fox

Jade Aguilar
Jade Aguilar is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Willamette
University in Salem, OR. Her main area of interest is the study of
gender and sexuality in Intentional Communities. Her dissertation
research, completed at the University of Colorado-Boulder, was on
commitment mechanisms used in Egalitarian Intentional Communities in
the United States. Her current research is on Senior Co-housing
Communities.


Vanishing of the Bees

tapped

Thursday, April 12 , 2012
7 p.m.

Honeybees have been mysteriously disappearing across the planet, literally vanishing from their hives. Known as Colony Collapse Disorder, this phenomenon has brought beekeepers to crisis in an industry responsible for producing apples, broccoli, watermelon, onions, cherries and a hundred other fruits and vegetables. Commercial honeybee operations pollinate crops that make up one out of every three bites of food on our tables. Vanishing of the Bees follows commercial beekeepers David Hackenberg and Dave Mendes as they strive to keep their bees healthy and fulfill pollination contracts across the U.S. The film explores the struggles they face as the two friends plead their case on Capital Hill and travel across the Pacific Ocean in the quest to protect their honeybees.
Filming across the US, in Europe, Australia and Asia, this documentary examines the alarming disappearance of honeybees and the greater meaning it holds about the relationship between mankind and mother earth. As scientists puzzle over the cause, organic beekeepers indicate alternative reasons for this tragic loss. Conflicting options abound and after years of research, a definitive answer has not been found to this harrowing mystery.

Website

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Mike Rodia Secretary for the Willamette Valley Beekeepers Association

Mike Rodia, Ph.D. is the Secretary for the Willamette Valley Beekeepers Association and he has been a beekeeper for 15 years. His B.S. and Ph.D. chemistry degrees along with a minor in biochemistry provided a basis for his career with Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division and the Oregon Fire Marshal’s office in the recognition, evaluation and control of chemical, physical and biological hazards in workplaces and at hazardous material spills. He has prepared and delivered hundreds of presentations and written works concerning chemicals as well as college classes in Toxicology and Hazardous Chemicals.

His extensive background in administrative rule review, preparation and propagation has helped local beekeepers to dissuade several cities in Oregon from imposing bans or severe restrictions on beekeeping.


Gerald Fox

Carolyn Breece Faculty Research Assistant, Entomology Dept. of Oregon State University

Carolyn Breece is a research assistant at the Oregon State University Honey Bee Lab, led by Dr. Ramesh Sagili. The Honey Bee Lab studies honey bee health and nutrition, brood pheromone, and analyzes bee samples for pests and disease.  She is also on the committee for the Oregon Master Beekeeper program, which is an education and service program for beekeepers of all levels. Carolyn’s main hobby is beekeeping, of course!

 

 

 

Forks Over Knives

tapped

Thursday, May 10 , 2012
7 p.m.

What has happened to us? Despite the most advanced medical technology in the world, we are sicker than ever by nearly every measure.
Two out of every three of us are overweight. Cases of diabetes are exploding, especially amongst our younger population. About half of us are taking at least one prescription drug. Major medical operations have become routine, helping to drive health care costs to astronomical levels. Heart disease, cancer and stroke are the country’s three leading causes of death, even though billions are spent each year to “battle” these very conditions. Millions suffer from a host of other degenerative diseases.
Could it be there’s a single solution to all of these problems? A solution so comprehensive but so straightforward, that it’s mind-boggling that more of us haven’t taken it seriously?
FORKS OVER KNIVES examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting animal-based and processed foods. The major storyline in the film traces the personal journeys of a pair of pioneering researchers, Dr. T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn.

Website

 

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Dr. Lynne Shinto N.D., M.P.H

Lynne Shinto, N.D., M.P.H, is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Ob-Gyn at OHSU. Dr. Shinto is recognized at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and nationally for her research expertise in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic neurologic disorders. In addition to her research, Dr. Shinto provides naturopathic medicine care at OHSU’s Neurology Wellness Clinic and the Center for Women’s Health Integrative Medicine Clinic. Where she counsels patients on incorporating healthy diets, stress reduction techniques, and dietary supplements to maintain wellness.

Dr. Shinto has an undergraduate degree from the University of Massachusetts. She earned her naturopathic degree from Bastyr University in Kenmore, WA, and her Master of Public Health from OHSU. After graduating from Bastyr, she completed a 2-year fellowship, in the Department of Neurology, with a focus on patient-oriented CAM research.


Gerald Fox

Dr. Mark Walker DO

Dr. Mark Walker is the Medical Director of the Hospitalist Program at Salem Hospital, and has served there since 2005. His primary professional focus is hospital medicine and his activities include patient care and leadership related to hospital care. He has engaged in significant research over his career, earning his Doctorate in Osteopathy in 1993 from the University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health, College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines IA. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City KS.
Dr. Walker has a strong belief in the science supporting the health benefits of a plant-based diet.


We're Not Broke

tapped

Thursday, Sept. 13 , 2012
7 p.m.

America is in the grip of a societal economic panic. Lawmakers cry "We're Broke!" as they slash budgets, lay off schoolteachers, police, and firefighters, crumbling our country's social fabric and leaving many Americans scrambling to survive. Meanwhile, multibillion-dollar American corporations like Exxon, Google and Bank of America are making record profits. And while the deficit climbs and the cuts go deeper, these corporations-with intimate ties to our political leaders-are concealing colossal profits overseas to avoid paying U.S. income tax.

Website

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Karin Hayes Producer/director

Karin Hayes’s first documentary was the duPont-Columbia University Award-winning film, The Kidnapping of Ingrid Betancourt (HBO/Cinemax 2004). Hayes also produced and directed (with Victoria Bruce) Held Hostage in Colombia, a documentary about three American contractors captured by FARC guerrillas in Colombia, and the 2008 Target® Filmmaker Award-winning film Pip & Zastrow: An American Friendship.
Hayes has contributed to other directors’ films including the 2006 Sundance documentary American Hardcore: the history of American punk rock from 1980-1986 (Sony Pictures Classics), and Disarm, a documentary about the devastating effects of landmines. Hayes has also worked on productions for PBS, National Geographic Channel, the Travel Channel, the Discovery Channel, and with The Cronkite Ward Company for TLC/Discovery Networks. In addition to feature documentary projects, Hayes has produced videos for the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian, and worked for the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
In 2010 Hayes’s first book, Hostage Nation: Colombia’s guerilla army and the failed war on drugs (co-authored with Victoria Bruce) was published by Knopf. Hayes graduated from UCLA with a degree in World Arts& Cultures, and lives in New York City.


Gerald Fox

Chuck Sheketoff Executive Director of Oregon Center for Public Policy

Chuck Sheketoff is a founder of the Oregon Center for Public Policy. OCPP opened its doors in September 1997 after Chuck received a "public interest pioneer award" from the Stern Family Fund.

OCPP does in-depth research and analysis on budget, tax, and economic issues. OCPP’s mission is to use research and analysis to advance policies and practices that improve the economic and social opportunities of all Oregonians. OCPP aims to improve public policy decision making and generate more opportunities for all Oregonians.

Prior to leading OCPP, Chuck lobbied the Oregon State Legislature on behalf of legal aid clients (1993, 1995) and the Oregon Law Center (1997). He represented the interests of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (now called Temporary Assistance to Needy Families), food stamps, Medicaid/Oregon Health Plan, General Assistance and long-term care programs.

Chuck has been actively involved in advocating for changes to Oregon's tax system since 1992. In 1997, he took the lead to help create two new tax credits for the working poor: the state earned income tax credit and the working family child care tax credit.

OCPP has exposed that many corporations pay only a small minimum tax and that corporations are picking up a smaller share of the income tax load than they did a generation ago despite growth in corporate profits. Chuck has pushed to close tax loopholes and inefficient, ineffective and unaccountable corporate subsidies. In 2009 and 2010 Chuck played a pivotal role in designing and securing enactment of Measures 66 and 67, laws that increased tax revenues from corporations and Oregon's wealthiest households.

Members of the legislature and lobbyists concerned about budget, tax and economic issues will tell you that OCPP reports are welcome additions to their bill files, and help them do their job. When advocates, policy makers or the media need timely, credible and accessible information about fiscal policy, they turn to Chuck and the OCPP.

Chuck has been a tireless advocates for disclosure of corporate taxes paid (and not paid) by large and publicly traded corporations. Chuck believes that if policymakers give the public more information about the tax liability of large corporations, the political climate would change and the legislature would be compelled to change the laws and start collecting a fair share of taxes from profitable corporations.

Chuck is a 1988 graduate of the University of Oregon School of Law and a 1977 graduate of the University of Vermont. He and his wife, award-winning journalist and best-selling author Naseem Rakha, have lived in Silverton since 1990 and have a son in middle school plus two cats and a dog.


 

The Happy Movie

tapped

Thursday, October 11 , 2012
7 p.m.

Does money make you HAPPY? Kids and family? Your work? Do you live in a world that values and promotes happiness and well-being? Are we in the midst of a happiness revolution?
Roko Belic, director of the Academy Award® nominated “Genghis Blues” now brings us HAPPY, a film that sets out to answer these questions and more. Taking us from the bayous of Louisiana to the deserts of Namibia, from the beaches of Brazil to the villages of Okinawa, HAPPY explores the secrets behind our most valued emotion.

Website

 

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Roko Belic Director via SKYPE

Roko Belic’s directorial debut, the acclaimed “Genghis Blues” (1999), won the Sundance Audience Award and was nominated for an Academy Award® for best documentary feature. He is co-founder of Wadi Rum Films, Inc. Roko started his filmmaking life in third grade with his brother, Adrian, when their friend, Christopher Nolan (Dark Knight Rises, Inception) borrowed a super-8 movie camera from his parents. Heavily influenced by Star Wars, the young team experimented with special effects and the surreality of film. Later, because his mother used a wrench to lock their TV to the local PBS channel, Roko became enchanted with programs through which he could explore the world.  Belic recently directed the 44-minute documentary “Dreams: Cinema of the Subconscious,” which was released on the “Inception” Blu-Ray. For his current project, Belic teamed up with Hollywood heavyweight Tom Shadyac (“Liar Liar,” “Bruce Almighty”), who executive produced, to direct the feature documentary HAPPY.  HAPPY combines powerful human stories from around the world with cutting edge science to give us a deeper understanding of our most valued emotion.


Gerald Fox

Erik Noftle Assistant Professor of Psychology

Professor Noftle received his B.A. degree in psychology from Grinnell College and his M.A. and Ph.D. in personality-social psychology from UC Davis. After a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship at Wake Forest University and a year as an Assistant Professor at Linfield College, he joined the faculty at Willamette in 2010. Dr. Noftle enjoys teaching courses in personality psychology and research methods, among others. Dr. Noftle’s research interests include the following topics: personality variability, consistency, stability, and change; personality and character development; individual differences in attachment styles; functionalist approaches to discrete emotions and behavior; and assessment and psychometrics.hd

 

The Clean Bin Project

tapped

Thursday, November 8 , 2012
7 p.m.

Is it possible to live completely waste free? In this multi-award winning, festival favorite, partners Jen and Grant go head to head in a competition to see who can swear off consumerism and produce the least garbageTheir light-hearted competition is set against a darker examination of the problem waste.  Even as Grant and Jen start to garner interest in their project, they struggle to find meaning in their minuscule influence on the large-scale environmental impacts of our “throw-away society”. Described as An Inconvenient Truth meets Super Size Me, The Clean Bin Project features laugh out loud moments, stop motion animations, and unforgettable imagery. Captivating interviews with renowned artist, Chris Jordan and TED Lecturer Captain Charles Moore, make this film a fun and inspiring call to individual action that speaks to crowds of all ages.

Website

 

Speakers

 

Jen Rustemeyer

Jen Rustemeyer is the woman behind the Clean Bin Project blog. She also produced and appeared in The Clean Bin Project documentary film which recently won its 9th festival award. Jen's a passionate "zero-waster" who, despite her deathly fear of public speaking, has toured 7600kms across the country by bicycle talking to schools and community groups about garbage and recycling. By day she works for Light House, a green building non-profit in Vancouver, and by night can be found researching, recycling, and making things from scratch. Jen sat on the RCBC organics working group, is a judge for the BC Green Games school competition, and sat on the board for the Projecting Change Film Festival.

 

Bailey Payne

Bailey Payne grew up in McMinnville, Oregon and moved to Santa Cruz, CA where he received a B.A. in Environmental Studies at the University of California.  After graduation, he worked with the Peace Corps as an environmental awareness educator with environmental groups and the Dominican Republic National Park Service.  He returned to California and taught elementary school in the small town of Kettleman City while earning a teaching credential from Chapman University.  Since March of 2002, Bailey has been a Marion County Recycling & Waste Reduction Coordinator.  He is on the board of the Oregon Green Schools Association and his work primarily involves coordinating Marion County recycling programs and assisting businesses and schools to improve their environmental practices. 

 

Alan Pennington

Alan Pennington is an Arkansas native who graduated with a BA in Biology from Hendrix College in 1982. Prior to moving to the Salem area in 1997, Alan was a science and math teacher in three foreign countries—Indonesia, Spain, and North Carolina. He graduated from Oregon State University in 1999 with a Master’s Degree in Environmental Health and was employed at the City of Salem as a Natural Resource Outreach Specialist to work on water quality and salmon issues. He joined Marion County’s Public Works as a Waste Reduction Coordinator in the summer of 2008 and heads up the EarthWISE program for the county. He is happily married to Leona Guthrie and has two children—Emmett and Aaron.

 

Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare

tapped

Thursday, December 13 , 2012
7 p.m.

ESCAPE FIRE: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare tackles one of the most pressing issues of our time: how can we save our badly broken healthcare system?
American healthcare costs are rising so rapidly that they could reach $4.2 trillion annually, roughly 20% of our gross domestic product, within ten years. We spend $300 billion a year on pharmaceutical drugs – almost as much as the rest of the world combined. We pay more, yet our health outcomes are worse. About 65% of Americans are overweight and almost 75% of healthcare spending goes to preventable diseases that are the major causes of disability and death in our society.
It’s not surprising that healthcare is at the top of many Americans’ concerns and at the center of an intense political firestorm in our nation’s Capitol. But the current battle over cost and access does not ultimately address the root of the problem: we have a disease-care system, not a healthcare system. The film examines the powerful forces maintaining the status quo, a medical industry designed for quick fixes rather than prevention, for profit-driven care rather than patient-driven care.

ESCAPE FIRE also presents attainable solutions. After decades of resistance, a movement to bring innovative high-touch, low-cost methods of prevention and healing into our high-tech, costly system is finally gaining ground. Filmmakers Matthew Heineman and Susan Froemke interweave dramatic personal arcs of patients and physicians with the stories of leaders battling to transform healthcare at the highest levels of medicine, industry, government, and even the U.S. military. ESCAPE FIRE is about finding a way out of our current crisis. It’s about saving the health of a nation.

Website

 

Speakers

Erin Martin D.O., MPH

Erin Martin is a board certified physician who is passionate about helping people understand their health and make better choices that lead to a better life. She believes that patients that fully understand what is causing their disease will be able to make more informed decisions that will help them reverse their illnesses.
Dr. Martin attended medical school at Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where she also received a Masters degree in Public Health. She completed a residency in Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of Utah before returning to her native Oregon where she practiced in a variety of settings including a community health center, private practice, urgent care, and emergency medicine. She began to realize that the medical system was not set up to help people stay healthy, but rather fostered chronic illness. Convinced that there is a better way of healing that is right in front of us, she decided to pursue training in Integrative Medicine. She completed a two year academic fellowship in Integrative Medicine through the world-renowned Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona under the guidance of such pioneers in the field as Andrew Weil, MD and Tieraona Low Dog, MD. She then went on to obtain training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine where she learned how to implement clinically effective programs for reversing heart disease, diabetes, obesity and many other chronic diseases.
Today Dr. Martin specializes in Functional and Lifestyle Medicine. She helps her patients identify and remove the things in their lives that are pushing them toward disease, and teaches them how to replace them with things that promote wellness and vitality in all areas of their life.
TrueMed Institute provides a non-judgmental space where patients are free to explore and make the changes necessary to experience total well-being. It is the culmination of Dr. Martin’s long-held vision for creating a life-changing space that promotes true wellness and joy in all aspects of life – mind, body and soul.


Aaron Crane

Aaron Crane is the Chief Finance and Strategy Officer of Salem Health, a large regional medical center, critical access hospital, and medical group practice, based in Salem Oregon. He came to Salem Health in January of 2004. Prior to his current role, he served Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU), Oregon’s only academic medical center, for seven years. He began his term at OHSU in 1997 as the corporate comptroller and was promoted to Hospital CFO in 2000. Mr. Crane has experience with two other community hospitals in Oregon. He recently completed his Masters in Healthcare Administration at the University of Minnesota. He has two children ages 20 and 17, and makes wine in his very limited spare time. Snow Skiing and scuba diving are his recreational passions.

 

Chasing Ice

tapped

Thursday, January 10 , 2013
7 p.m.

Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the James Balong conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.
As the debate polarizes America and the intensity of natural disasters ramps up globally, Balog finds himself at the end of his tether. Battling untested technology in subzero conditions, he comes face to face with his own mortality. It takes years for Balog to see the fruits of his labor. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate. Chasing Ice depicts a photographer trying to deliver evidence and hope to our carbon-powered planet.

Website

 

 

Speakers

Evelyn Sherr
Is a Professor of Oceanography, in the Earth, Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences Department at Oregon State University. Prior to coming to OSU, she graduated from Emory University in Georgia with a B.S. in Biology. She went on to receive her PhD in Zoology from Duke University and did her Post Doctoral work at the University of Georgia in the Microbiology Department. Professor Sherr’s research work focuses on aquatic microbial ecology, pelagic food webs, heterotrophic microbes and the ecology of the arctic and sub arctic marine ecosystems. Her work in the Arctic Ocean coincided with the period when summer sea ice loss was becoming increasing evident. Professor Sherr has participated in numerous field programs in the Arctic beginning in 1994, conducting research in Alaska, the Bering Sea and the North Pole, to name a few. She continues to conduct research
in the Arctic and has over 100 publications. She lives in Corvallis with her husband Barry.


Ed Brook
Ed Brook is a professor of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University and studies climate history to understand how the earth system responds to climate change. His work uses polar ice cores as recorders of past climate change, and focuses on the relationship between greenhouse gases and climate change, on time scales of decades to hundreds of thousands of years. One clear outcome of ice core studies is the recognition that human activities have radically altered the levels and cycles of major greenhouse gases, pushing the atmosphere toward a state it has not seen for at least 50 million years.

Ed Brook’s work has also contributed to our understanding of how quickly climate can change. For example, during the last ice age climate in many parts of the world shifted from cold to warm conditions over just several decades, and sometimes faster. The mechanisms behind these abrupt shifts are only partly understood. Ed’s research group is involved in further studies of their timing and impact, to better understand the probability of similar events in the future.

From 1996 to 2004 Ed was a faculty member at Washington State University before moving to his current position at Oregon State University. Ed has conducted field research in Antarctica, Greenland, Scandinavia, northern Canada, and the western U.S. and runs one of a handful of analytical laboratories devoted to greenhouse gases in polar ice cores. His research group is currently involved in projects at both poles, including the WAIS Divide Drilling project in Antarctica and the NEEM ice core in Greenland. Ed is a Leopold Leadership Fellow, a Google Science Communication Fellow, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives

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Thursday, February 14 , 2013
7 p.m.

Genetic Roulette show us Never-Before-Seen-Evidence points to genetically engineered foods as a major contributor to rising disease rates in the US population, especially among children. Gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, inflammatory diseases, and infertility are just some of the problems implicated in humans, pets, livestock, and lab animals that eat genetically modified soybeans and corn.
Monsanto’s strong arm tactics, the FDA’s fraudulent policies, and how the USDA ignores a growing health emergency are also laid bare. This sometimes shocking film may change your diet, help you protect your family, and accelerate the consumer tipping point against genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Don’t miss this film!

Website

 

Speakers

Ken Roseboro
Ken Roseboro has been called “the nation’s reporter on all issues surrounding
genetically modified foods” by Acres USA magazine. Ken is editor and
publisher of The Organic & Non-GMO Report, a monthly newsletter that focuses
on the threats posed by GM foods and the growing non-GMO food trend. He
is also editor and publisher of The Non-GMO Sourcebook, an annual directory
of suppliers of non-GMO and organic seed, grains, and ingredients. Ken is
author of Genetically Altered Foods and Your Health and The Organic Food Handbook
both published by Basic Health Publications. He is a member of the board of
directors of the Iowa Organic Association. He has spoken at many conferences
including Natural Products Expo West, All Things Organic, Acres USA
Conference, The Organic Farming Conference, National Heirloom Seed Expo,
and others.


George Kimbrel
CFS Senior Attorney George Kimbrell heads up the Center for Food Safety’s Pacific Northwest office in Portland, Oregon.  George practices environmental and administrative law with a focus on the impacts of new and emerging technologies. His legal and policy work spans a broad range of CFS program areas, including: genetically engineered (GE) foods; transgenic plants, trees and animals; food labeling; food safety and contamination; organic standards; factory farming pollution; aquaculture; pesticides; nanotechnology; and synthetic biology.  One of his cases, Monsanto v Geertson Seed Farms (2010), was the first U.S. Supreme Court case on the oversight of GE crops.  George has also published several articles on GE issues and often speaks on the topic.  He received his law degree from Lewis and Clark Law School, where  he now also teaches food and agriculture law as an adjunct professor.  George joined CFS upon completing a clerkship with the Honorable Ronald M. Gould, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Kim Goodwin
Kim Goodwin originally wanted to be a farmer.  Still does, in fact.  But as she explored the steps necessary to create and run a successful farm, while educating herself deeply in farming issues, she had a startling realization.  Farmers were so busy farming that they didn’t have the time to protect their right tofarm!  Kim instead realized the importance of helping to educate citizens about the harms that are occurring in our food system, and what we can do about it. Kim lives outside of Eugene.

Invisible War (Oscar nominated documentary!)

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Thursday, March 14 , 2013
7 p.m.

From Oscar®- and Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Kirby Dick (This Film Is Not Yet Rated; Twist of Faith) comes The Invisible far, a groundbreaking investigation about one of America’s most shameful and best kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military. The film paints a startling picture of the extent of the problem—today, a female soldier in combat zones is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire. The Department of Defense estimates there were a staggering 19,300 service members sexually assaulted in 2010 alone.

Focusing on the powerfully emotional stories of rape victims, The Invisible War is a moving indictment of the systemic cover-up of military sex crimes, chronicling the women’s struggles to rebuild their lives and fight for justice. It also features hard-hitting interviews with high-ranking military officials and members of Congress that reveal the perfect storm of conditions that exist for rape in the military, its long-hidden history, and what can be done to bring about muchneeded change. At the core of the film are often heart-rending interviews with the rape survivors themselves people like Kori Cioca, who was beaten and raped by her supervisor in the U.S. Coast Guard; Ariana Klay, a Marine who served in Iraq before being raped by a senior officer and his friend, then threatened with death; and Trina McDonald who was drugged and raped repeatedly by military policemen on her remote Naval station in Adak, Alaska. And it isn’t just women; according to one study's estimate, one percent of men in the military nearly 20,000 men were reportedly sexually assaulted in 2009. And while rape victims in the civilian world can turn to an impartial police force and judicial system for help and justice, rape victims in the military must turn to their commanders a move that is all too often met with foot-dragging at best, and reprisals at worst. Many rape victims find themselves forced to choose between speaking up and keeping their careers. Little wonder that only eight percent of military sexual assault cases are prosecuted. The Invisible War exposes the epidemic of sexual assault in the military – one of the most under-reported stories of our generation, a story the filmmakers are proud to be breaking to the nation and the world. They hope the film will help lead a national dialogue about the crime of rape perpetrated on the very people who have pledged to protect our country and are gratified to see the film is already making an impact. Since it premiered at Sundance, the film has been circulating through the highest levels of the Pentagon and the administration. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta watched The Invisible War on April 14. Two days later, he directed military commanders to hand over all sexual assault investigations to a higher-ranking colonel. At the same time, Panetta announced that each branch of the armed forces would establish a Special Victims Unit. While these are promising first steps, much more needs to be done. To that end, The Invisible War is a call for our civilian and military leadership to listen. And to
act.

Website

 

Speakers

Myla Haider
Myla Haider is a former criminal investigator, counselor, advocate, writer, and survivor of Military Sexual Trauma (MST). She served in the U.S. Army for nine years during which she deployed to Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq. As an Army CID agent she worked sexual assault cases involving both male and female victims. Ms. Haider has briefed members of Congress on systemic investigative deficiencies associated with sexual assault cases and written articles about sexual assault investigations published in the journal "Sexual Assault Report." Her experiences as an investigator, survivor and advocate were featured in the film "The Invisible War." Ms. Haider has served as a trainer for mental health providers and currently assists veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder stemming from combat, sexual assault, and other trauma in appealing unjust military discharges and obtaining benefits they deserve.


Dr. Lori Daniels
Dr. Lori Daniels is currently the military sexual trauma psychotherapist for the Portland (OR) Vet Center.  She earned her MSW from the University of Chicago in 1987 and worked as a social worker/psychotherapist for the VAMC American Lake (Tacoma, WA) inpatient and outpatient PTSD programs until 1992 when she moved to Honolulu.  She then worked as the Director of the PTSD Clinical Team of the Honolulu VAM&ROC (1992 – 2001).    After receiving her Ph.D. in Social Welfare from the University of Hawaii – Manoa in 2002, Dr. Daniels worked as Assistant Professor of Social Work for Hawai‘i  Pacific University (Honolulu, HI) and as a Consultant with the National Center for PTSD – Pacific Islands Division until 2008.  For the past 16 years, Dr. Daniels has presented information about her work with war-related PTSD at several International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies Annual Meetings, and has been the Co-chair of a community-based conference: Stress, Violence, and Trauma: Promoting Community Resilience (Honolulu, HI) from 2004-2009.  She currently facilitates two women’s veteran trauma groups out of the Portland Vet Center, as well as sees female and male MST survivors in individual psychotherapy. 


Heist: Who Stole the American Dreamtapped?

Thursday, April 11 , 2013
7 p.m.

Heist: Who Stole the American Dream? exposes the roots of the American economic crisis and the destruction of the American dream. With clear, fact-driven storytelling, Heist unflinchingly reveals the hollowing out of the U.S. economy - the result of four decades of deregulation, massive job outsourcing, and tax policies favoring mega-corporations and wealthy elites. Beginning with background on the New Deal, the film explores how FDR’s progressive policies were derailed by Ronald Reagan and subsequent presidential administrations, benefiting only the wealthiest investors and CEOs.Through expert testimony, investigative filmmaking and key archival footage, Heist unfolds critical historical background, beginning with the dismantling of FDR's New Deal, uncovering the ideological influence of the infamous Powell Memo and the Heritage Foundation's Mandate for Leadership on government reform, and traces both Republican and Democratic allegiance to big business.Heist exposes the full story: how corporate leaders worked with elected politicians of both major parties to create the largest transfer of wealth in history, looting the economy to create a gap between rich and poor previously seen only in impoverished colonial nations. Structured as a political thriller, Heist effectively connects the dots to show audiences how - and why - we live in an era of class warfare, and what we can do to restore democracy and economic fairness. The movie posits that a fair economy requires that those responsible for the risis be held accountable; rigorous reforms must be enacted into law; too big to fail corporations must be dismantled; progressive taxation must be restored; and a fair, sustainable local model of economic resilience must be accelerated. Heist is the rallying cry of the 99%, who can take this moment in history and transform the American economic and political landscape through information-sharing and direct action.

Website

 

Speakers

Donald Goldmacher
Donald Goldmacher, Producer/Director, is a longtime filmmaker, labor advocate, activist, and community psychiatrist with decades of experience observing, documenting and participating in social change. His first film, “Do No Harm,” exposed the controversial marketing and research practices of the pharmaceutical industry. His most recent feature documentary,Ruthie and Connie: Every Room in the House, about two lesbian activists in New York City, premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival, won over 20 festival awards, and aired on HBO and television stations around the world. In 2004, Donald produced “One Vote,” a 6 minute non-partisan video encouraging single, unregistered women to vote, for which he created a then innovative internet outreach strategy for distribution to millions of women, through a wide range of voter registration, women's, and public health organizations, including Planned Parenthood.

Russ Beaton
Russ Beaton obtained his B.A. from Willamette University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Claremont University, all in economics.  He taught at California State Fullerton and Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C., before returning to Willamette, where he was a professor of Economics for 33 years, and professor emeritus since 2003.  While at Willamette, he specialized in areas such as environmental economics, urban land economics, and energy economics, and has done several studies focusing on urban growth boundary policies.  He participated in the structuring and passing of Oregon’s land use laws, and has consulted to several state agencies, including ODOT, Department of Land Conservation and Development, Department of Energy, and Department of Economic Development. He has co-authored three books in the area of sustainable development, and is working on a fourth.  He also concentrates on gardening, grand parenting, and playing tennis.


I Amtapped

Thursday, May 9 , 2013
7 p.m.

I AM is an utterly engaging and entertaining non-fiction film that poses two practical and provocative questions: what’s wrong with our world, and what can we do to make it better?   The filmmaker behind the inquiry is Tom Shadyac, one of Hollywood’s leading comedy practitioners and the creative force behind such blockbusters as “Ace Ventura,” “Liar Liar,” “The Nutty Professor,” and “Bruce Almighty.”   However, in I AM, Shadyac steps in front of the camera to recount what happened to him after a cycling accident left him incapacitated, possibly for good. Though he ultimately recovered, he emerged with a new sense of purpose, determined to share his own awakening to his prior life of excess and greed, and to investigate how he as an individual, and we as a race, could improve the way we live and walk in the world.
Armed with nothing but his innate curiosity and a small crew to film his adventures, Shadyac set out on a twenty-first century quest for enlightenment.  Meeting with a variety of thinkers and doers–remarkable men and women from the worlds of science, philosophy, academia, and faith–including such luminaries as David Suzuki, Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Lynne McTaggart, Ray Anderson, John Francis, Coleman Barks, and Marc Ian Barasch –  Shadyac appears on-screen as character, commentator, guide, and even, at times, guinea pig. An irrepressible “Everyman” who asks tough questions, but offers no easy answers, he takes the audience to places it has never been before, and presents even familiar phenomena in completely new and different ways.  The result is a fresh, energetic, and life-affirming film that challenges our preconceptions about human behavior while simultaneously celebrating the indomitable human spirit.

Website

 

Speakers

Fariborz Pakseresht
Fariborz Pakseresht has served as the Director of the Oregon Youth Authority since March 2012. He joined the OYA in 2008 after seven years in a variety of leadership roles with the Oregon Department of Human Services and 12 years at the Oregon Department of Administrative Services. Director, he is responsible for overseeing the operations of the state’s juvenile corrections agency, which serves approximately 1,750 youth offenders ages 12-24 at any given time.

Mr Pakseresht has become known as a proponent of efficiency, effectiveness and transparency in government. He is also known for developing innovative programs that draw youth offenders into the social fabric of the larger society, teaching them useful skills and exposing them to cooperative community values.

He earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from Willamette University.

His community activities include serving on the board of directors of the YMCA of the Marion and Polk counties, the board of the Salem Peace Plaza, and on the planning committee of the Annual Salem Peace Lecture. He is also a fellow in the American Leadership Forum and a member of the Oregon Solutions Camp Odyssey Team. He was honored with the Annual Peacemaker Award in October 2012.

Fariborz’s interests include management theories and practices, personal and organizational change, human potential, communications, quantum physics and mindfulness. He lives here in Salem.


American Wintertapped

Thursday, June 13, 2013
7 p.m.

Produced and directed by Emmy award-winning filmmakers, Joe and Harry Gantz, American Winter is a documentary feature film that follows the personal stories of families struggling in the aftermath of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.
Years after the recession began, millions of families are struggling to meet their basic needs, and many formerly middle class families are finding themselves in financial crisis, and needing assistance for the first time in their lives.  Meanwhile, the social safety net that was created to help people in difficult times has been weakened by massive budget cuts, creating a perfect storm of greater need and fewer resources to help families in trouble. 
Filmed over the course of one winter in Portland, Oregon, American Winter presents an intimate and emotionally evocative snapshot of the state of our economy as it is playing out in many American families.   
Working together with the nonprofit organization 211info in Portland, the filmmakers were given full access to monitor and record calls from distressed families who were calling 211’s emergency hotline in search of help.  They then began following the stories of some of these callers in more depth over several months.  The film follows multiple families in their daily struggle to keep their heads above water, while facing overwhelming challenges and dwindling resources available to help them, creating a powerful firsthand view of Americans caught in today’s financial undertow.  

The experiences of the families in American Winter are a vivid illustration of what has been happening to families across America, including working families losing their homes, people who remain jobless or underemployed, children going hungry, families getting their heat shut off in the dead of winter, and people with health issues overwhelmed by medical costs. 

Framed through the personal stories of eight families, American Winter puts a face on the country's economic challenges and has the potential to humanize the discussion around these issues. When viewers see these hard working, relatable families in need, it breaks down stereotypes and makes it harder to justify cuts to social services, motivating and bringing together individuals and organizations working towards a new paradigm of opportunity for all Americans.
We are developing partnerships with local and national nonprofit organizations that can utilize the film to advance their specific missions. Additionally, American Winter’s social action campaign will focus on channeling the frustrations of struggling Americans into a movement for positive change, while also supporting legislators to pass bills that allow all Americans to have an opportunity to live a comfortable life and a chance at the American Dream.

Website

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Chuck Sheketoff Executive Director of Oregon Center for Public Policy

Chuck Sheketoff is a founder of the Oregon Center for Public Policy. OCPP opened its doors in September 1997 after Chuck received a "public interest pioneer award" from the Stern Family Fund.

OCPP does in-depth research and analysis on budget, tax, and economic issues. OCPP’s mission is to use research and analysis to advance policies and practices that improve the economic and social opportunities of all Oregonians. OCPP aims to improve public policy decision making and generate more opportunities for all Oregonians.

Prior to leading OCPP, Chuck lobbied the Oregon State Legislature on behalf of legal aid clients (1993, 1995) and the Oregon Law Center (1997). He represented the interests of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (now called Temporary Assistance to Needy Families), food stamps, Medicaid/Oregon Health Plan, General Assistance and long-term care programs.

Chuck has been actively involved in advocating for changes to Oregon's tax system since 1992. In 1997, he took the lead to help create two new tax credits for the working poor: the state earned income tax credit and the working family child care tax credit.

OCPP has exposed that many corporations pay only a small minimum tax and that corporations are picking up a smaller share of the income tax load than they did a generation ago despite growth in corporate profits. Chuck has pushed to close tax loopholes and inefficient, ineffective and unaccountable corporate subsidies. In 2009 and 2010 Chuck played a pivotal role in designing and securing enactment of Measures 66 and 67, laws that increased tax revenues from corporations and Oregon's wealthiest households.

Members of the legislature and lobbyists concerned about budget, tax and economic issues will tell you that OCPP reports are welcome additions to their bill files, and help them do their job. When advocates, policy makers or the media need timely, credible and accessible information about fiscal policy, they turn to Chuck and the OCPP.

Chuck has been a tireless advocates for disclosure of corporate taxes paid (and not paid) by large and publicly traded corporations. Chuck believes that if policymakers give the public more information about the tax liability of large corporations, the political climate would change and the legislature would be compelled to change the laws and start collecting a fair share of taxes from profitable corporations.

Chuck is a 1988 graduate of the University of Oregon School of Law and a 1977 graduate of the University of Vermont. He and his wife, award-winning journalist and best-selling author Naseem Rakha, have lived in Silverton since 1990 and have a son in middle school plus two cats and a dog.

David Cay Johnston

An American investigative journalist and author, a specialist in economics and tax issues, and winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Beat Reporting. Since 2009 he has been a Distinguished Visiting Lecturer who teaches the tax, property and regulatory law of the ancient world at Syracuse University College of Law and Whitman School of Management. From July 2011 until September 2012 he was a columnist for Reuters, writing, and producing video commentaries, on worldwide issues of tax, accounting, economics, public finance and business. Johnston has been board president of Investigative Reporters and Editors since June 2012.
He started his career at age 19 with the San Jose Mercury News and has been an investigative reporter and writer ever since, working for the Detroit Free Press, the Los Angeles Times and the Philadelphia Inquirer. He received his 2001 Pulitzer Prize “for his penetrating and enterprising reporting that exposed loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code, which was instrumental in bringing about reforms.” Johnston described how corporations were paying less in taxes, even as individuals were paying more.
Johnston is the author of numerous best-selling books on tax and economic policy. He lives with his wife Jennifer in Brighton, NY and has 8 children and 5 grandchildren.


#ReGeneration - tapped The Politics of Apathy and Activism

Thursday, September 12, 2013
7 p.m.

The award-winning documentary film, #ReGENERATION, explores the galvanizing forces behind the Occupy Movement and the state of social activism in our society. The film takes an uncompromising look at the challenges facing today’s youth and young adults as they attempt to engage on a myriad of social and political issues.

Focused on how our education, parenting, and media can influence us, the film follows three separate walks of life representing today’s generation. Each brings their own unique perspective – from an inspired collective of musicians working outside the corporate system, to a twenty-something conservative family about to welcome the birth of their second child, and a group of five high-school students from the suburbs looking for their place in society. Their stories are interspersed with the knowledge, wisdom, and personal reflections of some of the country’s leading scholars, social activists, and media personalities, including Noam Chomsky, the late Howard Zinn, Adbusters’ Kalle Lasn, Andrew Bacevich, Talib Kweli, and many others.

Narrated by Ryan Gosling and featuring a riveting soundtrack from STS9, the film explores how today’s generation approaches activism, how it is impacted by technology, our disconnection with nature and history, our consumer culture, and the economic factors holding many of us back from becoming more active participants in our communities. Through a diverse and intelligent series of stories, interviews and insights, we come to a deeper understanding of the influences shaping our society. We have entered uncharted territory, economically, environmentally, and intellectually–and we must look honestly at ourselves to create a sustainable future.

#ReGENERATION is the story of today’s generation… It is the story of us.

Website

 

Speakers

Gerald Fox

Courtney Dillard Professor of rhetoric and media at Willamette Univiersity

Courtney Dillard is a Continuing Instructor in the Communication & Media Studies Department at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. She received her Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Texas- Austin and her MA from The University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill. For over a decade, Courtney's research agenda has focused on persuasion and social change. In the last several years, she has primarily taught Public Speaking, Mass Media & Persuasion, Political Communication and Designing Persuasive Campaigns. She has also worked to support the persuasive efforts of nonprofit organizations and state agencies on topics ranging from healthcare to the environment. In 2008 she founded Common Good Persuasion (http://commongoodpersuasion.org), a communication consulting agency.

Stanislav Vysotsky Assistant Professor of Sociology at Willamette University

Stanislav Vysotsky received his Ph.D., M.A., and B.S. degrees in Sociology from Northeastern University in Boston, MA.His areas of expertise include: Social Theory, Race and Prejudice, Social Movements, Social Conflict, Hate Crimes & Hate Groups, Youth Culture (with an emphasis on Counterculture), Popular Culture, and Deviance.

Dr. Vysotsky’s research has focused on the conflict between supremacist groups in contemporary American society and their militant anti-fascist opposition through ethnographic and interview research with anti-fascist activists in order to understand the relationship between threat, space, subculture, and social movement activism. His current research is focused on understanding how social movement activists engage in practices of policing in prefigurative spaces and activities. In pursuit of this project he has conducted content analysis of the portrayal of the Occupy movement in the press and is currently interviewing activists who have engaged in policing practices as part of their social justice work.


Symphony of the Soiltapped

Thursday, October 10, 2013
7 p.m.

Drawing from ancient knowledge and cutting edge science, Symphony of the Soil is an artistic exploration of the miraculous substance soil. By understanding the elaborate relationships and mutuality between soil, water, the atmosphere, plants and animals, we come to appreciate the complex and dynamic nature of this precious resource. The film also examines our human relationship with soil, the use and misuse of soil in agriculture, deforestation and development, and the latest scientific research on soil’s key role in ameliorating the most challenging environmental issues of our time. Filmed on four continents, featuring esteemed scientists and working farmers and ranchers, Symphony of the Soil is an intriguing presentation that highlights possibilities of healthy soil creating healthy plants creating healthy humans living on a healthy planet.

Website

 

Speakers

Deborah Koons Garcia | Director, Writer, Producer

Deborah Koons Garcia has called Northern California home for over thirty years. Her film The Future of Food(2004) examines the alarming issues surrounding the rapidly increasing corporate domination of our food supply. It is the first major film to cover the history and technology of genetic engineering and the complex implications of releasing such crops into the food environment and food supply. It has been shown all over the world in theaters, food, farming, and film festivals and by citizens seeking to informa and inspire fellow citizens to take action. The Future of Food premiered theatrically at Film Forum in New York.

 

James Cassidy | Senior Instructor, Soil Physics and Organic Agriculture, Oregon State University

James Cassidy is a Senior Instructor in the Soil Physics and Organic Agriculture Department at Oregon State University. James has been with the university for over 10 years and his field of research includes soil education, organic food production and food composting.

James is also the faculty advisor for the wildly popular OSU Organic Growers Club - OSU's student farm. The student farm project has more than 300 student volunteers on its list-serve and continues to grow. The farm cultivates over 50 different fruit and vegetable crops and is just starting its 13th season.

Coming from a non-traditional background (Music industry for over 25 years) James is passionate about soil and is popular with students because of his dynamic speaking style.

 

 

 


A FIERCE GREEN FIRE: The Battle for a Living Planettapped

Thursday, November 14, 2013
7 p.m.

A FIERCE GREEN FIRE: The Battle for a Living Planet is the first big-picture exploration of the environmental movement – grassroots and global activism spanning fifty years from conservation to climate change. Directed and written by Mark Kitchell, Academy Award-nominated director of Berkeley in the Sixties, and narrated by Robert Redford, Ashley Judd, Van Jones, Isabel Allende and Meryl Streep, the film premiered at Sundance Film Festival 2012, has won acclaim at festivals around the world, and in 2013 begins theatrical release as well as educational distribution and use by environmental groups and grassroots activists.
Inspired by the book of the same name by Philip Shabecoff and informed by advisors like Edward O. Wilson, A FIERCE GREEN FIRE chronicles the largest movement of the 20th century and one of the keys to the 21st. It brings together all the major parts of environmentalism and connects them. It focuses on activism, people fighting to save their homes, their lives, the future – and succeeding against all odds.
The film unfolds in five acts, each with a central story and character:
1 David Brower and the Sierra Club’s battle to halt dams in the Grand Canyon
2 Lois Gibbs and Love Canal residents’ struggle against 20,000 tons of toxic chemicals
3 Paul Watson and Greenpeace’s campaigns to save whales and baby harp seals
4 Chico Mendes and Brazilian rubbertappers’ fight to save the Amazon rainforest
5 Bill McKibben and the 25-year effort to address the impossible issue – climate change
Surrounding these main stories are strands like environmental justice, going back to the land, and movements of the global south such as Chipko in India and Wangari Maathai in Kenya. Vivid archival film brings it all back and insightful interviews shed light on the events and what they mean. The film offers a deeper view of environmentalism as civilizational change, bringing our industrial society into sustainable balance with nature.

Website

 

Speakers

Mark Kitchell | Producer, Writer, Director

Mark Kitchell is best known for Berkeley in the Sixties, which won the Sundance Audience Award in 1990, was nominated for an Academy Award, and won other top honors. It has become a well-loved classic, one of the defining documentaries about the protest movements of the 1960s. Kitchell went to NYU film school, where he made The Godfather Comes to Sixth St., a cinema verite look at his neighbors caught up in filming The Godfather II - for which he received another (student) Academy Award nomination.

Laura Stevens | Organizing Representative for the Sierra Club Beyond Coal campaign

Laura Stevens, Organizing Representative for the Sierra Club Beyond Coal campaign in Oregon and Southwest Washington, works with concerned citizens to stop coal export projects and towards a coal-free northwest. Laura, a native Oregonian, obtained her B.A. from DePauw University, and has spent the past six years organizing for a number of environmental, human rights, and labor groups. After Laura launched and led the Sierra Club Campuses Beyond Coal campaign at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNC made a commitment to move their on- campus coal-fired power plant off of mountain-top removal mined coal immediately, and set a date to move the plant off of coal entirely. For more information on how you can help stop coal exports in Oregon, contact Laura at laura.stevens@sierraclub.org or visit www.coalfreeoregon.org.

 

 


 

Inequality For Alltapped

Thursday, December 12, 2013
7 p.m.

In this timely and entertaining documentary, noted economic policy expert Robert Reich takes on the enormous question of what has been happening to our economy. He distills the story through the lens of widening income inequality -- currently at historic highs -- and and explores what effects this increasing gap has not only on our economy but our democracy itself.

Website

 

Speakers

Chuck Sheketoff | Executive Director, Oregon Center for Public Policy

Chuck Sheketoff is a founder of the Oregon Center for Public Policy. The OCPP was established due to the "public interest pioneer award" Chuck received from the Stern Family Fund in September, 1997. Prior to coming to the OCPP, Chuck lobbied the Oregon State Legislature on behalf of legal aid clients (1993, 1995) and the Oregon Law Center (1997). He represented the interests of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (now called Temporary Assistance to Needy Families), food stamps, Medicaid/Oregon Health Plan, General Assistance and long-term care programs. Chuck is intimately familiar with Oregon's welfare system and has been a knowledgeable and harsh critic of state and federal welfare reform. He has also been actively involved in lobbying for changes to Oregon's tax system, and in 1997 he took the lead to help create two new tax credits for the working poor: the state earned income tax credit and the working family child care tax credit.

Matt Cato | Director of the Office of Life, Justice and Peace for the Archdiocese of Portland

Matt Cato is the Director of the Office of Life, Justice and Peace for the Archdiocese of Portland since July of 2009. His responsibilities include Metro Convener for the Oregon Faith Roundtable Against Hunger (OFRAH) and Steering Committee member of the Interfaith Network for Earth Concerns, a program of Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon. Before joining the Archdiocese, he spent 12 years in product development and training and development at Nike while concurrently co-chairing the St. Juan Diego Parish Social Justice Ministry. His wife Lisa co-chaired with him since the parish’s first mass in what became a vibrant ministry with a large, active and dedicated volunteer committee and a very supportive pastor.

 

Unacceptable Levelstapped

Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014
7 p.m.

Unacceptable Levels examines the results of the chemical revolution of the 1940s through the eyes of affable filmmaker Ed Brown, a father seeking to understand the world in which he and his wife are raising their children. To create this debut documentary, one man and his camera traveled extensively to find and interview top minds in the fields of science, advocacy, and law. Weaving their testimonies into a compelling narrative, Brown presents us with the story of how the chemical revolution brought us to where we are, and of where, if we’re not vigilant, it may take us.

Over 80,000 chemicals flow through our system of commerce, and many are going straight into our bodies. Even our unborn children are affected. Due to this constant exposure, we have approximately 200 synthetic industrial chemicals interacting with our cells every single day. Until recently, modern science really didn’t understand what that could mean for all of us in the long run, but that is changing.

Globally, disease rates are on the rise. Theories about the causes abound, yet the issues are complex and often muddied by the maneuvering of political and corporate interests. To explore different facets of common chemical exposure, Unacceptable Levels, was made in consultation with experts in multiple fields and is guided by a father on a personal journey as he attempts to bring these issues to light for everyone. Its primary goal? To determine whether we can prevent disease before it strikes us.

Unacceptable Levels opens the door to conversations about the chemical burden our bodies carry so that we can make informed decisions now and in the future. The film poses challenges to our companies, our government, and our society to do something about a nearly-unseen threat with the inspired knowledge that small changes can generate a massive impact.

Website

 

Speakers

Joel Nigg | Director, Division of Psychology and Professor of Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University

A native of Iowa, Joel Nigg travelled east to obtain a BA in the Comparative Study of Religion at Harvard, a Masters Degree in Social Work at the University of Michigan, and then ventured west to obtain a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of California at Berkeley in 1996. He joined the faculty in Psychology at Michigan State in 1996 and remained there until moving to OHSU in 2008. Joel directs the ADHD Program at OHSU, a large federally-funded program to investigate the causes of child attention, learning, and impulse control problems. He also has an interest in environmental contributors to child mental illness, including the potential role of dietary factors and neurotoxicant pollutants. He has over 140 peer reviewed publications and a book entitled What Causes ADHD (Guilford, 2006) and sits on several editorial boards and advisory bodies related to child mental illness. A licensed clinician, Joel also runs a neuropsychological assessment clinic for children one day per week at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. He has a passion for combining his scholarship with community involvement to address environmental challenges to children’s well-being.

Angela Crowley-Koch | Legislative Director, Oregon Environmental Council

Angela Crowley-Koch joined OEC in 2012 as Legislative Director. She was previously a Legislative Assistant for U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley where she handled transportation, small business, election reform and food safety policy. Prior to that, Angela was the Executive Director of Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility where she created their environmental health program and continued their efforts to advance nuclear non-proliferation and curb global warming. In addition, she served on the City of Portland’s Peak Oil Task Force in 2006. Angela graduated from Grinnell College and studied International Development in India and Namibia.

Terms and Conditions May Applytapped

Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014
7 p.m.

Admit it: you don't really read the endless terms and conditions connected to every website you visit, phone call you make or app you download. But every day, billion-dollar corporations are learning more about your interests, your friends and family, your finances, and your secrets... and are not only selling the information to the highest bidder, but freely sharing it with the government. And you agreed to all of it. With fascinating examples and so-unbelievable-they're-almost-funny facts, filmmaker Cullen Hoback exposes what governments and corporations are legally taking from you every day - turning the future of both privacy and civil liberties uncertain. From whistle blowers and investigative journalists to zombie fan clubs and Egyptian dissidents, this disquieting exposé demonstrates how every one of us has incrementally opted-in to a real-time surveillance state, click by click- and what, if anything, can be done about it.

Website

 

Speakers

Becky Straus | Legislative Director, Americann Civil Liberties Union

Becky Straus joined the ACLU of Oregon staff in 2011. She directs the ACLU of Oregon’s advocacy and lobbying efforts before the Oregon Legislature and coordinates ACLU testimony before public bodies on the full range of civil liberties and civil rights issues in Oregon. She is also ACLU’s primary lobbyist on City of Portland matters. The intersect of privacy and technology is a priority issue for the ACLU and Becky engages multiple activities to further this work. Through outreach to industry representatives, advocacy before policymakers, and speaking engagements – most recently, as a panelist at the ACLU Northwest Civil Liberties Conference – she leads the ACLU’s work to ensure that Oregon laws protect privacy rights as technology advances. Becky earned an undergraduate degree in Political Science from Kenyon College in Ohio and a law degree from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland. She has studied abroad in London and in Quito, Ecuador.

Matthew Kellegrew | BORDC Legal Fellow

A recent graduate of the Golden Gate University School of Law, where he served as the Student Chair of the GGU National Lawyer's Guild chapter and as the Bay Area Law School Vice President of the NLG. During law school he interned at Justice Now where he conducted policy work to end the practice of forced sterilizations in CA Women's Prisons, for both civil and criminal attorneys on cases related to police abuse during Occupy Oakland and for the San Francisco Public Defender's Office. Prior to graduating, he was inducted into the Pro Bono Honor Society, won multiple Witkin Awards and completed his degree with a specialization in Public Interest Law. Before law school he attended The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash., where he majored in Economics and Social Systems. While in Washington he coordinated the Bread and Roses Advocacy Center and actively organized around poverty, homelessness and housing issues as well as against the use of public ports to support the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He currently lives in Oakland, Calif., where he remains active both politically and in his community.

The House I Live Intapped

Thursday, Mar. 13, 2014
7 p.m.

For the past 40 years, the war on drugs has resulted in more than 45 million arrests, $1 trillion dollars in government spending, and America’s role as the world’s largest jailer. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available than ever. Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In captures heart-wrenching stories of those on the front lines — from the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge — and offers a penetrating look at the profound human rights implications of America’s longest war.

The film recognizes drug abuse as a matter of public health, and investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have resulted from framing it as an issue for law enforcement. It also examines how political and financial corruption has fueled the war on drugs, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures. The drug war in America has helped establish the largest prison-industrial system in the world, contributing to the incarceration of 2.3 million men and women and is responsible for untold collateral damage to the lives of countless individuals and families, with a particularly destructive impact on black America.

Website

 

Speakers

Cassandra Villanueva | Director of Organizing and Advocacy, Partnership for Safety and Justice

Cassandra has worked for Partnership for Safety and Justice (PSJ) for over a decade. Her in-depth experience as staff member, board member and youth coalition partner exemplifies her long-standing commitment and dedication to the mission and values of PSJ. Prior to joining PSJ, Cassandra worked for Service Employees International Union (SEIU), National Council of La Raza, Salem-Keizer Coalition for Equality, Mano a Mano Family Center, CAUSA Immigrant Rights Coalition, Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN), Voz Hispana and the Oregon State Legislature.

Frank Thompson | Former Superintendent of the Oregon State Penitentiary

Frank Thompson is a retired corrections professional with experience in Arkansas and Oregon. During his years in Arkansas correctional environments as a warden, he provided oversight functions for the construction of the Delta Regional Medium Security/Regional Jail Prison. He later operated the state’s only Boot Camp.

In Oregon Frank served as Superintendent of the Oregon State Penitentiary, Columbia River Correctional Institution, Santiam Correctional Institution, Mill Creek Correctional Facility, and South Fork Forest Camp. Promoted to Assistant Director of Institutions, Frank was responsible for the daily operations of eleven of the state’s then thirteen prisons. He also served for two years as an Assistant Director of the state Community Corrections Division.

While serving as the Superintendent of the Oregon State Penitentiary, Frank was called upon to administer the death penalty on two occasions in 1996 and 1997. As a result of that experience, Frank comes to us with a desire to work with other Oregonians who wish to see the Public Policy of Capital Punishment repealed

Deep Greentapped

Thursday, April 10, 2014
7 p.m.

Based on six years of intensive research and devoted exclusively to solutions to man-made global warming, "Deep Green" cuts through the clutter to bring new clarity to an increasingly-urgent situation. Called "a template" for getting off fossil fuels by the Los Angeles Times and praised for "offering hope instead of despair" by the Oregonian, this award-winning documentary ignites the debate on global warming with compelling examples of the ingenuity and resourcefulness being devoted to conquering the escalating climate crisis before it's too late.

Over three years in the making, "Deep Green" was the culmination of a quest that began in the 1990s for Portland-based filmmaker Matt Briggs, when he first noticed the damaging effects of global warming on Northwest forests. Concerned, he attended scores of conferences, including the first of ten Bioneers in 1999, and spent four years pouring over the latest research through scientific journals and more than 400 books. When "Deep Green" began principal photography, many of the solutions-such as the first solar thermal plants, hybrid electric cars, and living buildings-had not advanced beyond the concept stage, or were just being built.

Website

 

Speaker

Matt Briggs | Writer, Director, Producer

Matt Briggs makes his directorial debut with "Deep Green." He previously helped pioneer the wild mushroom industry in the U.S., beginning in 1981, by co-founding what quickly became the largest commercial operation in North America to collect and deliver fresh wild fungi to restaurants, specialty stores and such other clients as the White House.

The son of a college professor who later became Dean of Students for Portland State University, Briggs obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of Oregon, where he majored in both the arts and premed. He spent another six years studying at the New England College of Chinese Medicine and San Francisco College of Oriental Medicine before obtaining his license to practice in Oregon and California. In between, Briggs embarked on two separate global treks that gave him a traveler’s perspective on different cultures in 50 countries.

Feeding Frenzytapped

Thursday, May 8, 2014
7 p.m.

While discussions about our spiraling health crisis have tended to focus on the need for more exercise and individual responsibility, Feeding Frenzy trains its focus squarely on the responsibility of the processed food industry and the outmoded government policies it benefits from. It lays bare how taxpayer subsidies designed to feed hungry Americans during the Great Depression have enabled the food industry to flood the market with a rising tide of cheap, addictive, high calorie food products, and offers an engrossing look at the tactics of the multibillion-dollar marketing machine charged with making sure that every one of those surplus calories is consumed.

Features industry analysts, health experts, and advertising scholars, including Marion Nestle, Kelly Brownell, Sut Jhally, Brian Wansink, and Michele Simon.

 

Speakers

Nancy Ludwig | MS,RD,LD, Integrative Dietitian

As an integrative dietitian, Nancy Ludwig assists her clients in making healthy food choces through self-discovery. She also teaches nutrition and conducts food demonstrations and workshops in classroom settings, small client groups, and online, as well as at health and wellness events.

Ludwig has a degree in Nutrition from Pennsylvania State University and earned her master's in Food Science and Technology from Oregon State University. In addition to her private practice she has 15 years experience in product development, 10 years inspecting food processors for organic certification, and 8 years of teaching nutrition at the community college level.

Dr. Michael Grady | Family Practitioner, McClaine Street Clinic

Dr. Michael Grady is a specialist in family medicine at the McClaine Street Clinic in Silverton and is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

Dr. Grady received a B.S. in Biology from the Santa Clara University in 1972 and his M.D. degree from OHSU in 1976. He has been a family physician for 35 years and is a past president of the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians. He currently serves on the Community Leadership Council of We Can Do Better, a forum for discussion of health and health policy.

 

Triple Dividetapped

Thursday, September 11, 2014
7 p.m.

Triple Divide is said to be the only documentary of its kind on the controversial subject of fracking capable of speaking to all sides, with exclusive interviews from the industry, experts, and Americans suffering in the wake of shale gas development. It’s the best movie on fracking to date using facts, not fiction or spin.
The documentary is a project by PublicHerald.org, a Pennsylvania based nonprofit organization. Triple Divide is built on evidence from cradle-to-grave investigations that attempt to answer the question, “How are state regulations and industry handling impacts from fracking?” Throughout the film’s 10 chapters, which cover waste, class II injection wells, drinking water contamination, split-estates, the “pre-drill test scandal”, and the “pressure bulb” are on the ground accounts of hair-raising journalism.
Hard-hitting, Triple Divide is also fair. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is highlighted in the film for “weakly enforced regulations”. The film reveals how water contamination is being covered up by the industry and the state, essentially rewriting water quality history in the United States by dismissing predrill tests. Meanwhile, state regulators are using compliance as a means of regulating without enforcing the law, abandoning the public in the wake of shale gas development.

 

Speakers

Melissa A. Troutman | Filmmaker & Producer at
Public Herald Studios, U.S.

Melissa Troutman began investigating shale gas extraction as a newspaper reporter in her hometown of Coudersport, Pennsylvania before joining editor Joshua Pribanic to co-found the investigative news nonprofit Public Herald and eventually create Triple Divide. She has experience as a traditional print and multimedia journalist with a flare for photography, teaching, songwriting, and dance. As Manager Editor at Public Herald Melissa strives to unearth, or sometimes dust off and reorganize, meaningful stories that are valuable to all readers. You can follow her reporting on twitter @melissat22.

Joshua B. Pribanic | Filmmaker & Producer at
Public Herald Studios, U.S.

Joshua Pribanic is Editor-in-Chief and co-founder of the investigative news nonprofit Public Herald. He began work as an investigative journalist in Ohio before moving to Pennsylvania, where he built a foundation of investigations on fracking. Triple Divide is his first feature as a filmmaker, which has reached an audience in over 30 countries after its 2013 release. You can follow his reporting on twitter @jbpribanic.

 

Ted Gleichman | Sierra Club’s Beyond Natural Gas campaign

bio and picture coming soon...

GMO OMGtapped

Thursday, October 9, 2014
7 p.m.

Today in the United States, by the simple acts of feeding ourselves, we are unwittingly participating in the largest experiment ever conducted on human beings. Each of us unknowingly consumes genetically engineered food on a daily basis. The risks and effects to our health and the environment are largely unknown. Yet more and more studies are being conducted around the world, which only provide even more reason for concern. We are the oblivious guinea pigs for wide-scale experimentation of modern biotechnology. GMO OMG tells the story of a fathers discovery of GMOs in relationship to his 3 young children and the world around him. We still have time to heal the planet, feed the world, and live sustainably. But we have to start now!

 

Speakers TBA

 

 


 

Citizen Kochtapped

Thursday, November 13, 2014
7 p.m.

When Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker stripped state workers of their union rights in 2011, was it simply a classic face-off between labor and management, or a bold political move designed to weaken his party's political opposition? Set against the rise of the Tea Party and Occupy movements, the US Supreme Court's 2010 ruling in Citizens United, and the 2012 presidential campaign, Citizen Koch documents the consequences for democracy when private interests determine who is elected to deliver public good.

Official Theatrical Trailer www.citizenkoch.com from Elsewhere Films on Vimeo.

 

Speakers TBA